Earthman's Almanac   The collected interplanetary calendars
comprise the core of
Earthman's Almanac™, but the almanac includes more.  
Articles about space science careers, exploration, robotics, astronomy,
cosmology, and speculation are all material for the almanac in its physical form.  
The online almanac, here, features the current information regarding the
interplanetary calendars.  There are separate pages for the Classification of
Worlds System that was so important in developing the almanac and the
Interplanetary Calendar System.  The magazine,
Extraterrestrial Revolutions
also has its own page as well as the interplanetary calendars.  (See links at left.)

This online version is prepared for educators and others interested in keeping up
on the time, dates, and seasons on other worlds as well as reading about futures
in the exploration of space and the theories that explain the cosmos.  Check back
for updates.
Trademarks - 2010,
Earthman's Enterprises,
Cleveland, Ohio.
Earthman's Almanac
EarthmansAlmanac.com
What Day is it on Other Planets in the Solar System?   
NOTES:  

SD refers to Sol Date, the dating system for the interplanetary calendars.

The lune is the current sidereal period of the moon in a series of ten sidereal periods named after
mythological names related to the moon from cultures around the world with the decalune (the
entire series) serving as a calibration device between interplanetary calendars of the solar system.

The top number for any given day is the day of the year in that calendar.  This is followed by the day
of the week below, the month in that calendar below that, the day of the month, and finally the
hours in that calendar day.

In the
Mercannum & Mercudiary, there are also listed after the day of the year which of two solar
days, four years, and six sidereal days ("sida", singular "sidum") is current in the regular
installment period of four years per
Mercannum & Mercudiary.

The year of each calendar is listed to the left along with the hemiannum for the
Areannum, the
quintannum for the
Cereannum, the zodium for the Joviannum, and the zodium and elementium
for the
Saturannum, Urannum, and Neptannum.  (These are periods longer than a month, but less
than a native year for these worlds.)  For years listed with period separators the first number is the
year, the second number is the zodium, and the third number (if there is one) is the elementium.

For the
Areannum and the Cereannum the days are slightly longer than the rest of the
interplanetary calendars, so the days and days of the week don't match up with the rest of the
calendars very often.  Check back later for more info on this and the eventual inclusion of the
Venudiary data.

Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars are the inner planets and super planetoid worlds.  Jupiter, Saturn,
Uranus, and Neptune are the outer planets and super nimboid worlds.  Ceres, Pluto, Haumea,
Makemake, and Eris are dwarf planets and super cometoid worlds.

Because the native days of Mercury and Venus are too long for useful human calendar days and
those of the gas giants are too short and all are likely to be irrelevant to human exploration for
some time as none provides hospitable surfaces if any the calendar days for these worlds are
artificial days.  Their names have been spelled in an alternate form to indicate this.  The days of
the week of the
Terrannum and the Areannum are not altered because their calendar days are or
are very nearly native days, although, the name "Wednesday" has been shortened in the
Areannum to "Wensday", which is carried over into the other interplanetary calendars as
"Wensde".  In the
Cereannum "Wensdea" is used as all the calendar days of the Cereannum are
compound artificial days, three native days in one calendar day, "tridea", and each "trideum" is thus
given the plural suffix "-dea" in its name to indicate that each calendar day on Ceres, which
although it's rotational period is shorter than the gas giants', has a surface useful for human (and
robotic) exploration, has three native days of slightly more than 9 hours (on average by the
Cereannum) within it, thus serving as shifts in a 'round-the-clock (here, the Cerechronum) work
schedule.

Times given with the
Areannum are the time of day in Universal Earth Time/Terrachronum
(UET/TC), which is equivalent to Universal Time (UT) in the
Terrannum in which the given day of
the
Areannum begins at the Martian meridian.  Times given with phases of the Moon in the
Terrannum are given in UET/TC.  Daylight Saving Time is given for the USA standard.

Meteor shower indications are for peak dates.

NM = New Moon; FQ = First Quarter; FM = Full Moon; TQ = Third Quarter

Seasons are: winmer (N winter/S summer), sprill (N spring/S fall), sumter (N summer/S winter),
and fang (N fall/S spring: pronounced "fong").

Terrachronum™, Arechronum™, Cerechronum™

EarthmansAlmanac.com™
Earth photo composites by Reto Stackli, NASA
Copyright - 2010, Will
Napoli, Cleveland, Ohio.
Permission to copy this
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teachers in no fee
classes and E3 and
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Students may also copy
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Lune
Jul. 26, 2010 CE
Jul. 27, 2010 CE
Jul. 28, 2010 CE
Jul. 29, 2010 CE
Jul. 30, 2010 CE
Jul. 31, 2010 CE
Aug. 1, 2010 CE
Khons
Cassini distant
Tethys flyby, 9 SD
  SL-3 launch to
Skylab, -27 SD
Salyut 6 deorbit,
-18 SD
Apollo 15 Moon
landing, -29 SD
Ranger 7 Moon
impact, -36 SD
Progress M-49
deorbits, 4 SD
Mariner 6 Mars
flyby, -31 SD
Progress M-59
deorbits, 7 SD
Mercannum &
Mercudiary

44 MA
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
Monde
Tuesde
Wensde
Thursde
Fride
Saturde
Sunde
Noctus
Noctus
Noctus
Noctus
Noctus
Noctus
Noctus
3rd Sideum
3rd Sideum
3rd Sideum
3rd Sideum
3rd Sideum
3rd Sideum
3rd Sideum
4th Year
4th Year
4th Year
4th Year
4th Year
4th Year
4th Year
2nd Solar Day
2nd Solar Day
2nd Solar Day
2nd Solar Day
2nd Solar Day
2nd Solar Day
2nd Solar Day
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
Venannum
16 VA
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
Monde
Tuesde
Wensde
Thursde
Fride
Saturde
Sunde
Thalassa
Thalassa
Thalass
Thalassa
Thalassa
Thalassa
Thalassa
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
Terrannum
10 TA
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Capricornia
Capricornia
Capricornia
Capricornia
Capricornia
Capricornia
Capricornia
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
24  FM  1:36
24
24  Alpha
Capricornids
24
24  Delta
Aquarids
24
24
Areannum
Outer
Hemiannum,
5 AA
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
Wensday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Spica
Spica
Spica
Spica
Spica
Spica
Spica
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
13:00
13:00
14:00
15:00
15:00
16:00
17:00
24
25
25  Mariner 7
launch to Mars,
Mars 1969A
launch failure,
-17 AA
24
25
25
24
Cereannum
Scorpium,
2.5 CeA
1,207
1,208
1,209
1,210
1,211
1,212
1,213
Thursdea
Fridea
Saturdea
Sundea
Mondea
Tuesdea
Wensdea
Minervia
Minervia
Oppavia
Oppavia
Oppavia
Oppavia
Oppavia
24
25
1
2
3
4
5
27
28
27
27
27
27
28
Joviannum
Aquarium,
1.6 JA
1,936
1,937
1,938
1,939
1,940
1,941
1,942
Monde
Tuesde
Wensde
Thursde
Fride
Saturde
Sunde
Amalthemon
Amalthemon
Amalthemon
Amalthemon
Amalthemon
Amalthemon
Amalthemon
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
Saturannum
Scorpium
Lithium,
0.9.3 SA
8,011
8,012
8,013
8,014
8,015
8,016
8,017
Monde
Tuesde
Wensde
Thursde
Fride
Saturde
Sunde
Iapetumon
Iapetumon
Iapetumon
Iapetumon
Iapetumon
Iapetumon
Iapetumon
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
Urannum
Piscium
Helium,
1.1.2 UA
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
Monde
Tuesde
Wensde
Thursde
Fride
Saturde
Sunde
Puckimon
Puckimon
Puckimon
Puckimon
Puckimon
Puckimon
Puckimon
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
Neptannum
Sagittarium
Helium,
0.4.2 NA
15,612
15,613
15,614
15,615
15,616
15,617
15,618
Monde
Tuesde
Wensde
Thursde
Fride
Saturde
Sunde
Larissamon
Larissamon
Larissamon
Larissamon
Larissamon
Larissamon
Larissamon
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
24
24
24
24
24
24
24